Interview with Author Brett Armstrong!

Hello Brett, nice to meet you!

author-shot (1)

 Tell us a bit about you where are you from and other than writing what else do you enjoy? 

Well, I’m a Christian, which is probably the most defining trait about me. For some, I’m sure that’s off-putting, but I’m open to having a dialogue to discuss why it needn’t be.   

Past that, I’m thirty and told I look fifteen on occasion. I’m told it’s a good thing, but it really makes it awkward when I go to vote, and they ask if I’m there to watch my sister (who is really my wife) or when I’m trying to seem like a very-on-top-of-my-game author.

 I’m from a small town in West Virginia and grew up an only child, so I’m pretty adept at being alone and am pretty much socially incompetent. But it has led to me loving reading, writing, and art. I mainly sketch and do a little clay sculpting when needed for my wife’s projects (https://epic-yarns.com/).    Sorry had to do a shout-out, because she is amazing. We also have a little boy who I think is both half-crazy and absolutely incredible. My family has three generations of gardeners at work (my dad, me, and the little guy) and I work as a programmer for the Division of Infectious Disease Epidemiology in my state.

How did you start writing? What was your inspiration to create? 

Those are two really big questions, and I’m sure the latter will get touched on later, so I’ll try to cover the first. I got my start as a writer by being a little boy reading in the local library. My mom was a pre-school teacher, so some days we would go and spend two-three hours at the library, and she would look over the children’s section for good books to share with her students. Meanwhile, I would sit over at a table by myself reading whatever caught my eye. Usually, it was history books or Arthur legends. After reading a really catchy, kid-friendly book about the Aztecs, I felt like writing my own story about them. So, at nine years old I wrote my first original story. It was about a slave from a rival tribe who was captured in battle and was slated to be offered as a sacrifice. He escapes, blends into Aztec society and rises through the ranks until he can get revenge. It was only five pages, and I haven’t the faintest how it occurred to me that I could write something myself, but thereafter, writing was always a part of me.

 Who is your favorite author, is there anyone out there that inspires you? 

This is a tough question. When I was younger, I would have said HG Wells and Shakespeare. I still really enjoy both, but I’d say CS Lewis just blows me away with his ease in discussing complex theology and philosophy. I really like Timothy Zahn as well for the way he creates some complex characters without ever losing sight of the action of a story.

What genre do you enjoy reading? What’s your favorite book and why?

I tend to read eclectically of late, but often it is speculative fiction of some sort. Which makes sense as my favorite book, as of about a year ago, is “Chronicles of Narnia: The Silver Chair”. Which as an amusing anecdote, I refused to read for years because I thought having a chair as the centerpiece for a book seemed silly. The only thing silly turned out to be me for thinking ill of CS Lewis’s work.

I’m also a big fan, like a lot of people, of “The Fellowship of the Ring” and my favorite recent read is “Exo” by Fonda Lee.

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing? 

I wouldn’t say the first book getting published changed things for my writing as much as my second one did. There was still so much I hadn’t learned yet about the author side of being a writer that I had to make a major adjustment from purely writing to writing and “author activities”. I’m still trying to learn how to strike a balance, though I will say I don’t write with quite such a literary style now. Whenever you go from writing purely as art to writing for art/entertainment to be shared with others you have to make adjustments and its been a big learning experience for me.

Have you ever thought about writing in a different genre? If you could, what genre would you like to dabble in? 

It’s not advised by most marketing gurus, but I tend to write a variety of genres. My first book was historical fiction, my second sci-fi/dystopian, and my upcoming third book is epic fantasy. Among my works-in-progress are the subsequent entries in the two series I’ve started and another historical fiction novel, along with pure sci-fi, a speculative/historical novel, a contemporary romance (really out of my element there probably), and a horror book. At one time I was a bit of a genre elitest, but over time my philosophy has shifted. I feel strongly that I would follow a good story into whatever genre it needs.

Am I the only one who gets hung up on commas? Do they make you go blah! when you’re writing? 

Oddly enough, I’m coming to enjoy punctuation and correcting it. Ever since working with the editor on my second book, I’ve really enjoyed revising things, and part of that is the commas and other elements of punctuation (yay for EM dashes!). It’s not unlike the relationship between histones and DNA. Histones (punctuation) affect how the DNA (words) are read, and that changes what the overall outcome is immense. So any time I can use simple punctuation to do profound things to the way a sentence is read, I kind of get excited.

What three tips would you give any aspiring writer? 

 

  1. Don’t be afraid of planning, in both your writing and marketing, but don’t obsess over it. Some structure is good, a lot can just be stressful and frustrating.
  2. Know your book. Challenge yourself to express its plot and most intrinsic and valuable qualities and contributions to literature in the simplest, sparest language possible. It will really help in pitching your book to just about everyone.
  3. Never forget why you write. This is especially important for Christian writers, who often draw the potency for their purpose from the impact their works have on the faith of others.

What are you working on now? What will you release next? 

I’m working on the follow up to Day Moon right now. It’s so close to being done, I just have to set aside some time and complete it. I’m also rewriting a historical/speculative novel that’s been dear to me for years. But the big news is, I have the first book in an epic fantasy series coming out June of this year! Quest of Fire: The Gathering Dark is kind of an intersection of CS Lewis, JRR Tolkien, and Star Wars. I’m ridiculously excited about it coming out, because ever since I was a kid I’ve been imagining these other worlds, but they’ve usually been very small, very focused, but “Quest of Fire” is a big world. A big story with so many smaller stories, so many possibilities inside it. It’s more adventurous than my past books, but still has a lot of heart and depth to it. Here’s a little more about it:

The harshest reality Anargen ever faced in his tiny village is one day having to work in the regional mines—and finding a way to talk to the girl of his dreams, Seren. After Anargen pledges his loyalty to the ancient High King, strange things begin happening and Anargen finds himself torn from his home and loved ones on a journey north with three other young knights chosen for a special quest. Their mentor, Sir Cinaed, has been asked to arbitrate a centuries-old dispute between the men of Ecthelowall and the dwarves of Ordumair. Cinaed neglects to mention that the dwarves loath the knight order to which Anargen and his friends belong. Worse still, an arcane evil known as the Grey Scourge begins stalking them and it becomes obvious there is more at stake than a petty rivalry. The Grey Scourge is determined to ruin the peace talks and ensure a lost treasure held by the dwarves is never found by the four youths for whom it was meant. As the negotiations degenerate into open conflict and Ordumair’s fortress is besieged, Anargen and his friends fight not just for the survival of the dwarves, but the fate of their world.

So… where can we get your books? 

Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Books-A-Million, Kobo, Audible, and a whole host of diverse places including Walmart.com. If you’re local to West Virginia, you can even swing by Empire Books & News in Huntington to snag signed copies they have on their shelves.

daymoon (1)        destitutio quod remissio

 

https://amzn.to/2H4WjHX                             https://amzn.to/2vmo4Gp

 

How would you define what being a successful writer means?

Research has shown reading has a very potent impact on the mind of the reader. The brain processes things almost the same way as it does actual actions taken by the reader. For me, fiction should be entertaining and escapist, but it also needs to better prepare a reader to face the realities of the world the reader wouldn’t be as readily able to as in the world of a book. I consider one of my most successful moments as a writer to be when someone read my first book and let me know that she was giving a copy to a loved one because she thought it might help him through a hard time in his life. That is beyond encouraging and success as I see it.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers?

I would say it’s a double-edged sword. On one hand, you can’t help but have some sort of ego as a writer to think anyone would want to read what you write. But at the same time, there is incredible humility too in putting something out for readers and allowing them to participate in the creative process. Because writers ultimately adjust based on their readers’ comments. I would say an ego might help you push past bad reviews and self-doubt, but to an extent, those things also help fuel the desire to improve. Whether improve is more specifically to write in a way that contemporary readership enjoys most or to improve at the craft itself.

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

I’m going to sound like I’m digressing, but bear with me.

I liken writing to being a tour guide. A writer has explored his or her novel’s fictional landscape and you want to take readers through it as well. As the guide you owe it to the reader to make it the most enjoyable trip you can, even if it is ultimately your tour and your prerogative to choose the route.

 Book reviews are the reader’s way of telling the writer what he or she felt about the tour. They can discuss the landscape itself, the tour route, and the guide. Good or bad, I try to take those comments in stride. Having been through a number of college writing workshops I know from the outset I’m going to get a diverse reaction. One person will love the pace and characters, another won’t. Like those critiques, I read all the reviews my books get (and usually take them personally) and then when a sufficient number of them complain about an aspect of the book, then I try to pay attention to that in my subsequent writing.

 More than anything though, I try to remember the advice from before and focus on why I write. If I can find examples of the book doing the things it needs to, then even if only a sampling of people like it, then at least there are some people being impacted by it. And conversely, even if people lavish it with praise, I can keep my head down and moving forward.

How do you go from an idea for a book to the birth of the story? Is the process the same for every book you write? How long does it take you to write a book?

 So this is picking up on the idea from earlier, but just about every story I write begins in one of two ways. The first, is rarer, but yielded my first novel, Destitutio Quod Remissio. I started with an idea, what does real forgiveness look like? What does “forgiving as Christ forgave” from Colossians 3:13 look like? Then the protagonist, Marcus, formed from that. His personality developed along with the shortcomings and character flaws that would have to exist at the start of the story in order for him to have sufficient growth to highlight the underlying theme. Since I feel like all storytelling is like pathfinding, I liken it to looking for someone’s home who you know, but having to navigate some really interesting terrain to find your way there.

The second is my usual and led to my second novel, Day Moon. I got caught up in imagining a scene. Day Moon’s first chapter opens with the scene that got me asking all the questions needed for a novel to come out of it. This is more often how I do it, because for me to actually get a story to a finished novel I have to be hooked on it. Kind of swept up into the world and determined to see where the paths lead me. That early scene and the questions it generates having to keep building new questions and new scenes with captivating themes around them and meaningful interactions between characters. Most importantly though, I have to feel like there is a reason to tell the story. I like entertaining readers, but it can’t just be about that. There has to be something more, a feeling, an experience, a meditation, etc. but there has to be something the reader can carry with him or her after finishing the last page.

Since I really have to be ensnared by a story to tell it, the time it takes to write one varies wildly. Especially now that my son is in charge of so much of my time. But really, if I’m honest, I have to admit stories will only come together in their own time. I believe God really shapes our creative processes, and there are times I say a novel is done but then six months, a year later, something out of nowhere will hit me and I’ll realize, “Oh, no. I never really got it. THIS is what it’s about. THIS is what needs to happen.” And then I go and rewrite significant portions. Or the entire thing. My upcoming epic fantasy novel has been with me for ten years and has been rewritten completely twice, but pretty much three times. No one should read that initial draft, but what it has become, what I couldn’t see for so long, is worth reading. It’s like going back to the same spot year after year and thinking you’ve seen it all and then, no, there’s something more, something that makes that last trip back special. So, to finally give a direct answer, it may take six months to complete an initial draft, but it may take years to refine a story to the point that it is ready to share and represent everything the story needed to from the beginning.

 

Contact for Brett:

Blog:  https://brettarmstrong.net/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/BArmstrongWV

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brettarmstrongwv/

 

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AMANDA’S BOOK REVIEW

https://amandasbookreviewsite.wordpress.com/2018/05/21/further-adventures-in-barn-town-barn-town-series-book-2-by-eve-culley-review/

Further Adventures in Barn Town (Barn Town Series Book 2) by Eve Culley ~Review~

*Thank you to the author for a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review*

Children’s books are so important and I feel that they need to be reviewed just as much as adult books. However, with children’s books, the best way to review them is by reading them to your children. I read Further Adventures in Barn Town by Eve Culley to my two kids. My kids are ages 6 and 2.

This children’s book is approximately 88 pages. It has chapters and is good for children who are just beginning to read chapter books. The book is narrated by a cat named Ol’ Stripe who is the deputy of Barn Town. Barn Town is a large farm and this book follows all the events and adventures that take place. This book discusses many themes like bullying and having courage. The characters are ducks, chickens, bunnies, a fox, hawks, goats and many more.

The book does have pictures but they seem to be the author’s own personal pictures taken on a farm. At first, I thought it looked a little cheesy but my sons LOVED the pictures. They love animals and it made the story realistic for them. The editing looked well done, I only found a missing comma or two. My only major issue the font. It looked like Times New Roman to me. With a children’s book, having a larger and different font could make it a little more appealing. Overall, I liked that these stories were humorous and light-hearted. I rate this book 4 out of 5 stars! My kids really enjoyed reading about the animals and learning about them!

Posted in Amanda's Book Review, animals, authors, blog, books, cats, chickens, children, children stories, creative writing, ducks, family, geese, goats, short stories, work, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Author E.A. West and being GDPR compliant.

I’ve come across several authors today who haven’t heard about the GDPR, so I’m posting this as a kind of public service announcement. The GDPR is the General Data Protection Regulations created by the European Union. It goes into effect May 25, and we all need to be in compliance by then or we could face ridiculously massive fines. Yes, this applies to everyone regardless of where they are in the world if they have a website, mailing list, or blog that’s accessible by people in the EU (so all of us).

It sounds a whole lot scarier and more difficult to get in compliance than it actually is, although it can be time consuming and sometimes frustrating. Here’s a blog post that gives information about the GDPR and what it means for authors (and editors). It has a link at the bottom to part 2, which contains even more information. https://www.marymccauleyproofreading.com/…/how-will-the-gdp…

I’m not an expert on this, but I’ve been researching and learning about it for a couple of months, and I think I’ve done everything I needed to do to be GDPR compliant. Be aware that there is some conflicting information out there, particularly regarding mailing lists, so do your research and go with what you think is best (and maybe consult a lawyer if you want a more official opinion).

The GDPR will affect editors and authors whose clients and blog or newsletter subscribers include EU citizens. So if you haven’t yet taken action on the GDPR or don’t know what your obligations are, this article is for you.
MARYMCCAULEYPROOFREADING.COM
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Romantic,Dystopian, Espionage she writes them all.

Hello Laura. It is nice to meet you! Tell us a bit about you where are you from and other than writing what else do you enjoy? 

Hello, my name is Laura Hines. I am from Sequim, Washington, but currently living in Spokane for school, and a new life. I enjoy knitting, crocheting, writing stories, designing book covers, photography, and art.

How did you start writing? What was your inspiration to create?

I started writing when I was 14 years old, short stories, amateur stories, but as my hunger for reading and creating my own worlds grew, so did my writing. I just one day took up the computer and began to write. I don’t know what it was that inspired me. I guess I just felt I could write a better ending to a movie, and began to do just that.

Who is your favorite author, is there anyone out there that inspires you? 

My favorite author is Jane Austen, but I also like Suzanne Collins, the writer of the Hunger Games Trilogy. Jane Austen is the one I pattern most of my romantic period stories. I do love Suzanne Collins because of the dystopian theme. Science fiction and fantasy are another one of my favorites.

What genre do you enjoy reading? What’s your favorite book and why?

Dystopian is my favorite, but I love period books, like westerns. Dystopian is my favorite because I enjoy people trying to defeat the evil that is trapping them in the world they are in.

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing? 

I realized that someone would be reading it and they would be the critics, so I decided to take some classes on how to write an award-winning novel.

If you’ve published a series, what is the series about?

Have written a series, called the Survivor series, about a dystopian series, a young woman who learns she has a special gene that could save the fate of the current world as is, but the powers that be want to control the population.

What was it like creating back to back stories that link? 

Easy as pie. I am a pantzer. I write by the seat of my pants. Just don’t outline or anything.

Have you ever thought about writing in a different genre? If you could, what genre would you like to dabble in? 

I have written in several different genres already. Romantic, Mail Order Bride, Dystopian, Espionage, Spy

What has been your most proud moment as an author? 

Just to have my siblings say, is there another book?

Was there ever a time you wanted to pick up your laptop, and then launch it out the window with frustration? 

Nope, I just know that sometimes it’s hard to write. Taking breaks is the only way to let off the frustration.

Are you a “plotter” or a fly by the seat of your pants “pantster” as a writer? 

Pantster. Fly by the seat of the pants. No structure or outline. I am not good at outlining.

Am I the only one who gets hung up on commas? Do they make you go blah! when you’re writing?

Commas are my favorite subject. I love to use them a lot. It’s hard to find a way to get the commas to change. 🙂

What three tips would you give any aspiring writer?

Don’t give up; don’t let anyone tell you-you can’t write and be yourself while you write.

What are you working on now? What will you release next? 

I am currently working on two different stories.

My third Mail order bride is Katie Tyree, from Scotland, who decides to take a treacherous trip across the Atlantic, to marry a man she thinks is a good man. After meeting him, she finds herself falling in love with the wrong man. My other book is called Possession, about an angel/demon child who discovers her destiny is to become the next mistress of Lucifer. But with the help of her aunt, her boyfriend, and a few other important people in her life, she fights and changes her destiny.

So… where can we get your books? 

Amazon is the place you can get my books. The author names are Joanna Springer, Adriana Potter, Deborah West. I use a pseudonym for protection. And also because they are all different genres.

How would you define what being a successful writer means?

Just write write write. And Don’t let negative reviews get you down. Prove them wrong.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers?

Ego helps to a certain degree because it helps you with keeping your confidence up.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I research facts on google, or borrow books from the library, pertaining to the subject I am writing, photocopy and highlight it. I also have books for terms, romantic scenes and the like to help me write.

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

I am happy when I get a review, negative or not. It means people are reading and giving their honest opinion of my work.

What was your hardest scene to write?

Love scenes. I am a single woman so that the love scenes would be the hardest, but also death scenes too.

What’s your writing schedule like?

I write when I get an inspiring thought, and I keep a notebook in my backpack in case I get an idea or a thought.

What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

My mom is a writer, and I have a few friends who are writers too. We exchange books and give our opinions on the books, helping each other sharpen up our skills.

How do you go from an idea for a book to the birth of the story? Is the process the same for every book you write? How long does it take you to write a book?

I watch a movie or read a book, and if I don’t like the plot, I change it the way I want it.

How have your family and friends accepted your career as a writer? Are they supportive?

They build me up and tell me that I am a good writer. My siblings love my stories, and my mom edits and helps me promote. My grandmother loved my stories before she passed, so I dedicate my stories to her.

Do you tend to base your characters on real people or are they totally from your imagination?  

Real people and some people are made up. Mostly the character is what I want to be when I feel a little inadequate about myself.

What was the inspiration for your latest work of fiction? 

Hunger Games, Divergent, and Maze Runner. My Survivor stories are part of that genre.

Where would you like to travel to and why? 

Ireland, because I have ancestors from Ireland, and I would like to see all the ancestors in the United States, who formed my life.

Tell us about how you develop your characters?

 I have my idea of what a man should be like, strong, sexy, masculine, take charge, but respects their lover, treats her like she is her own person, straight, and the woman is a warrior, who can hold her own and doesn’t need a man to protect her but is an equal in desire and motivation.

Which one of your characters is your favorite and why?

My Emery and Gayle books, Cora is my favorite because she has to endure a lot. Her husband disappeared, and she has to run the ranch on her own, fending off suitors, and raising her child without him being there.

What would you like readers to know? 

Just enjoy the books, and hopefully, they will find a message and get inspired in their own life.

Contact Laura:

https://www.facebook.com/Adriana-Potter-Author-693641087370374/

https://www.facebook.com/deborahwestbooks/

 

Books by Laura:

Awaken

https://www.amazon.com/SURVIVOR-AWAKENING-Adriana-Potter-ebook/dp/B00M8PLKLS/ref=sr_1_3?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1523391515&sr=1-3&keywords=Adriana+Potter

Song of the Heart

https://www.amazon.com/Emery-Gayle-Heart-Joanna-Springer-ebook/dp/B0114AB9NQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1523391436&sr=1-1&keywords=Joanna+Springer

Emma

https://www.amazon.com/Emma-Widowed-Rancher-Order-Bride-ebook/dp/B07BJCXSC2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1523391374&sr=8-1&keywords=Emma+and+the+Widowed+Rancher

 

Posted in Adriana Potter, authors, blog, books, creative writing, Deborah West, Dystopian, Espionage, Joanna Springer, Mysteries, Romance, Uncategorized, work, writing | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Author Linda Suit – Spunky Doodle’s Mom

Hello Linda, nice to meet you!

 Linda author pic

Tell us a bit about you where are you from and other than writing what else do you enjoy?

An Atlanta city girl turned country; I now live in rural AR with my husband, Jerry and our animals, including an amazing pet squirrel, Spunky Doodle. We have four pet miniature goats and an old dog, Tinker. We have spent a lifetime traveling the world doing mission work and feeding my wanderlust, which is why I became a travel agent.

How did you start writing? What was your inspiration to create?

My writing journey began later in life with inspirational articles for a church newsletter. Our Pastor graciously told me he hated writing his column because mine was so much better. I chose to consider my writing style different, not better. Every writer has something to offer. He has a much greater gift with the spoken word.

What genre do you enjoy reading?

 When I read it is purely for enjoyment. My day is filled with details and can be very stressful. I don’t want to have to tax my brain to figure out a plot. I just want to lose myself in a good story. I do like mysteries with a splash of romance. Iris Johansen does a good job fitting this bill for me.

If you’ve published a series, what is the series about? 

 Almost three years ago a very special critter was literally thrown into our laps. spunky and jerryEnter Spunky Doodle, a unique, sassy, wonderfully personable little squirrel found my husband in the woods. She was all alone and immediately climbed on his gloved hand. I went back with him later, and she climbed into my arms, refusing to be left alone. I tried. She followed us. The rest is history. Spunky writes daily stories and has brought smiles and inspiration to many. She has also left her mark on me, as I’m her Mommy tree.

What was it like creating back to back stories that link? 

spunky watermellonWith Spunky as the inspiration for my stories, there is certainly no shortage of material. Many are based on her antics and personality, but she also weaves life lessons for young and old as well as inspiration to others.

Have you ever thought about writing in a different genre? If you could, what genre would you like to dabble in? 

I also enjoy inspirational writing, much of which is woven into Spunky stories.

What has been your most proud moment as an author? 

Two things instantly come to mind. We have a blind friend that told me once,”I can actually see it happening when I read your stories”. Proud moment! Another is a friend who had been housebound for years. She told me Spunky stories were the only bright spot in her day. During her last week on earth, her granddaughter lay in bed with her, reading Spunky stories and laughing together. It made her final moments on earth happier. It is priceless when you can bring joy and laughter to someone who so desperately needs it.

Was there ever a time you wanted to pick up your laptop, and then launch it out the window with frustration? 

My desktop, yes, every single day. I love writing, but when it comes to anything technical, even the simplest things, I throw up my hands and walk away.

Are you a “plotter” or a fly by the seat of your pants “pantster” as a writer?

My writing has all been short stories and based on personal experiences. Many times it takes time to process those experiences, and there does not seem to be a set time period for this. I just “know” when it’s time. I don’t even think about what I’m going to write; it seems to flow from my heart to my fingers. I don’t think the way I write, it just happens. Some of my journeys are more profound than others, and it takes my mind and heart whatever time it takes to get to the point of sharing them. Many times I go back and read what I’ve written and I have to wonder how those words arrived on the screen.

What three tips would you give any aspiring writer?

Find a subject you are passionate about!

Just write! Get it down on paper in some form.

Talk to published authors to see where you want to go from here.

What are you working on now? What will you release next? 

A short story for a book to be published later this year. Also, a children’s book and possibly an adult version of same is sitting in my computer waiting for me to fine tune.

How would you define what being a successful writer means?

There is a huge difference in being a successful writer and being a published writer. In my heart, I feel I am successful if by sharing my personal experiences I can make readers feel as if they were there seeing what I am describing, instill laughter, inspiration, and hope. That’s my measure of success. In the end, that’s what counts.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? 

 I have no aspirations of becoming rich and famous from my writing but I think we do need to take pride in our work. If that is ego then it’s a good thing. Just don’t take it too personally if another writer offers suggestions that aren’t quite in your comfort zone.

What’s your writing schedule like?

I write when I feel something is ready to come forth. Things pop into my head when I sit down in front of the screen; then it seems to flow.

How have your family and friends accepted your career as a writer? Are they supportive?

 My husband has been my constant source of support and encouragement. However, I cannot overlook the many friends that have pushed me forward with the “You can do this” nudge. I tend to want to write for the sense of satisfaction I feel when it’s done, and the joy it brings to others. I openly admit that I have little inspiration when it comes to trying to get anything published.

Do you tend to base your characters on real people or are they totally from your imagination?

 I couldn’t even begin to imagine the characters I use in my writing. I am blessed to have traveled to the ends of the earth and have encountered countless “characters” that have inspired me. There simply is not enough time to do them all justice.

 Where would you like to travel to and why? 

 We have spent our lives traveling the world, both as a travel agent, for personal enjoyment, and for mission work. I am quite content now, at my ripe old age, to sit here on my little farm and enjoy our animals and the serenity of our creek behind the house.

Which one of your characters is your favorite and why?

 Spunky Doodle is without a doubt the shining star in my writing. If you haven’t read her stories, you in for a real treat. I don’t mean that to sound boastful, she is a blessing from God and has enriched my life and that of so many she has touched with her stories.

 Meet Spunky Doodle and how she came to live with Linda at the end of the interview.

 What would you like readers to know? 

 I am an only child, have always been shy, but my world comes alive when I write. I don’t think I am special. I feel God has given me a talent to share, through whatever avenues that come available. My goal is to connect with my readers in such a way that I make them smile, belly laugh, weep silent tears, teach life’s lessons, however simple they might be so that they will take away something special from anything I write. That is enough for me.

Visit Spunky on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/linda.suit

or on Pandoras Box Gazette the second Saturday in each month for the newest adventure in “Spunky Tales” https://www.pandorasboxjt.com/

 

SPUNKY DOODLE FINDS A HOME

spunky window 2

I was little, lost, and alone. I couldn’t find my Mommy anywhere and I was very scared. Oh look, here comes someone! He came close and I peeked over some bushes. I decided I really needed him as a friend, so I was brave and climbed on his glove. Boy was he surprised! He talked to me but then he left, so I hid in the bushes again. I was so afraid. Please let him come back. Yes, there he is! I was glad to see him cause I was really worried since it was getting late and I was hungry. He sat down, played, and talked with me. I tried to tell him he was nice but I really needed a Mommy. Oh no, he’s leaving again. What am I going to do? I don’t know how to take care of myself. Yes! Here he comes with a lady. I hope she’s nice and wants me as much I as need her. I will do my best to convince her. I’ll be good.

I ran from behind a tree and before she knew it, I was on her shoulder. Hi! Then I kissed her neck and sat on her head. She was really surprised I didn’t bite her. We played for a bit but then she put me down, and they walked away. No, please, you can’t leave me, I’m all alone, I need you to be my Mommy! She looked kind of sad but kept walking, so I followed them. I was not taking no for an answer. I ran up her leg, into her arms and wouldn’t let go. She looked at the nice man, then down at me and said, “Ok, Spunky, you can come home with us.” Silly lady thought I was a boy at first! I lost my squirrel Mommy, and that makes me really sad but how lucky can I be to find someone to take care of me? They took me home, fed me, but now the bad part…she gave me a bath! I’m so glad I found them, even after the bath cause I got to snuggle with her. My new Mommy and Jerry Boy take really good care of me, even if they do make me eat veggies before I get my nut for dessert.

I curled up in Jerry Boy’s pocket to sleep. After a few nights of this, I was asleep in his pants pocket after all my antics, and Mommy was ready to put me to bed. First trick was to get me out of his pocket, so Jerry Boy reached in to get me, and I was not having it. I started kicking and burrowing deeper. So he has a mad squirrel in his pocket, and every time he tries to get me I kick, bite, and squeal trying to get him to leave me alone…getting the picture? He is stretching to give me more room and I am getting pretty close to forbidden territory. The look on his face is priceless. He is squirming to avoid permanent damage, and Mommy is laughing so hard she almost fell out of her chair. Moral of the story, when a squirrel is sleepy let her sleep!

Fast forward to today, it’s been almost three years, and I have a lot of friends young and old that love reading my stories. I even have conversations with them. Can you imagine people actually talking to a squirrel? Take my word for it, they do! When I got discouraged from writing, someone would say, “Spunky, you are the only thing that brought a smile to my face today.” So you see, I was sent here for a special reason, to bring laughter, teach my little friends about life, and tug at your heartstrings.

 

 

 

 

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Interview with P. G. Shriver

Hello, Penny! I am so glad you are here today.

P. G. Shriver

Tell us a bit about you where are from and other than writing what else do you enjoy?

Hi, Eve and readers! It’s a pleasure to visit your blog. I live near Waco and write from my horse ranch. I love creating, repurposing, and illustrating. I also love to read. Currently, I’m re-reading books I’ve had on my shelf for over 20 years.

How did you start writing? What was your inspiration to create?

The best way to answer is “I was born a storyteller.” I love telling stories. I wrote a sad poem about clown when I was in second grade. It won the newspaper contest and was published as the first place winner. From the time I saw my name in print, I knew my true form of communication was writing. I could express myself, my feelings, my inner thoughts through words and people understood me, connected with me, saw me. That’s what makes me write.

Who is your favorite author, is there anyone out there that inspires you?

I read so many children’s books during my years of teaching middle school, and if I had to pick an author for that genre, it would be Jerry Spinnelli. I am also an avid fan of Dean Koontz. I love his Odd Thomas series, though I haven’t had time to read the last few books in the series.

What genre do you enjoy reading? What’s your favorite book and why?

I love fiction in all aspects, and some non fiction. My reading favorites are humor, fantasy, and suspense. I’m not a big fan of “fad” books. I like to read books with staying power.

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

About the only aspect of my writing that changed after my first book was accepted for publication is my revision process. I already knew I needed to polish and then polish more, but the actual process of working with a publishing house editor was daunting. It was great, but after a while I was done. I can go over my work continuously for… ever, and it not be “finished”. At one point, the editor had to tell me, “That’s it!” and so I learned to tell myself that.

If you’ve published a series, what is the series about?

Actually, I’ve published two series and one trilogy. The trilogy is a superhero tale about twelve teens with unusual gifts. The second series is a school humor series about a boy who in making the right choices, he makes the wrong choices. In the first book, he uses teacher’s stapler to fix items he’s broken. In the second, he tries to help a stray dog. In the third, his imagination literally runs wild while writing a story for class. I wrote that series under my other pseudonym. The third series is about a traveling saddle who enjoys helping friend on her travels to Texas Festivals.

What was it like creating back to back stories that link?

I love series writing because the character gets to come back. I’ve had numerous readers of my single books ask me if those books will become series. To me, that’s a testament to the staying power of my characters and storylines. I love hearing that. I just need more time to write. There’s never enough time.

Have you ever thought about writing in a different genre? If you could, what genre would you like to dabble in?

Yes, I have thought about writing a self help book, but it’s not what I really want to spend time doing. I’ve also considered coffee table books, but again, I love telling stories.

What has been your most proud moment as an author?

It’s hard to pick one moment, so I’ve narrowed it down to two. The first moment was at a book festival in College Station. A young couple bought my first picture book, Master Stinky Dances, for their eighteenth month old. They visited with me for a bit while thumbing through the book with him, then handed him the book and set him down to walk. As they moved to another table, he sat on the floor and turned the pages. My pictures connected with him. The second time was after a Sally the Travelin’ Saddle reading when a young man asked me, “What is the theme of your book?” I promptly asked him, “What do you think the themes is?” After our exchange, his teacher–who was excited beyond words–approached and asked if I had an extra copy. She wanted to buy for her room because that young man never interacted in class. I almost cried.

Was there ever a time you wanted to pick up your laptop, and then launch it out the window with frustration?

Only due to programs or computer related issues. Never over writing. I’ve grown so used to typing stories on my computer that my handwriting is horrible.

Are you a “plotter” or a fly by the seat of your pants “pantster” as a writer?

 I’m a head plotter and writing pantster. I do a great deal of planning in my mind before I sit down to write. The magic happens when I begin writing, though. The stories just grow. The characters write them. Then I revise, revise, revise and edit and send it to an editor, and maybe revise some more.

Am I the only one who gets hung up on commas? Do they make you go blah! when you’re writing?

I don’t pay any attention to commas. I add them, or don’t. I worry over the story. I let my editor worry about commas. She tells me what to do with those commas. Sometimes I listen, sometimes I don’t.

What three tips would you give any aspiring writer?

  • Tip 1: Write every day even if you don’t feel like it.
  • Tip 2: Don’t skip revision and editing.
  • Tip 3: Never give up on your writing goals or dreams.

What are you working on now? What will you release next?

Now that the third festival book is “put to bed”, I’m going to complete the rough draft for The Gifted Ones The Spiral. That is my next big project. I’m also illustrating a book for another author, which has to be finished also.

So.. where can we get your books?

The easiest place to find them all is at www.geanpenny.com, or www.pgshriver.com. You will find them at any online retailer and a few brick and mortar bookstores here and there. If you ask for them at a bookstore and it’s not in stock, they can order it. You might even find them in a few libraries.

How would you define what being a successful writer means?

To me, being a successful writer is accomplishing your writing goals one at a time. If your goal is to make a living writing, and your doing so, you’re successful. If your goal is to touch the lives of your readers, and you’ve received reviews that say so, then you’re successful. To me, being successful is being happy and making others happy to have known me through my characters. Sure, I would love to spend all my time writing and make a living from it, but that doesn’t constitute success to me. Happiness defines success, and I’m pretty happy with my books and readings and writing daily, so I guess I can say I’m successful.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers?

I think it depends on the genre they are writing. Some writers can play that, some can’t. If you have an ego that negatively affects your sales, then it’s hurting you, but if it increases your sales because people just have to know why you are that way, then it’s working.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I research anything I don’t know while I’m writing. If I am unfamiliar with a place I’m writing about, I drive there, take pictures, scope it out. I’ve done that several times for a few romance books I’m working on. To tell a story people connect with, you have to research.

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

Reviews are for buyers. I only read reviews over books I’m considering as a purchase. I love to hear from librarians, teachers, students through email, Facebook, Twitter, and other social media with comments about my work or presentation. And, I’ve been known to use their comments as “true reviews” for my website.

What was your hardest scene to write?

My hardest scene to write the twist in Dead Perfect. I cried while I was writing it. I wanted Mel to find her happiness, and then I gave her grief! How can a writer do that to a character that has grown so close to them? Yikes! I did it, though! I think I had to leave my computer three times before I finished writing that section.

Dead Perfect

What’s your writing schedule like?

I try to write every morning. There are times I write in the evening after work, like now. Whenever it’s quiet, I spend time illustrating or writing.

What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

There are a few authors I can call friends, but I really don’t have time for socializing except on Facebook. I see them at festivals and we hug and talk and inspire each other. They are in the children’s book arena also, and there’s no jealousy, no spite. It’s great to have friends you can talk to about your work or marketing or travel. I consider that crazy chick (get it?), Barn Town Eve a friend! And there’s Kathleen Shields who writes the Hamilton Troll series. There’s also, Connie Peck who writes horse stories.

How do you go from an idea for a book to the birth of the story? Is the process the same for every book you write? How long does it take you to write a book?

I have so many ideas. I have to record them all. Then I sit down, after a little time of thinking, and start writing! Beginnings are my favorite to write. My process is the same every time. Where I need research, I stop and locate what I need. The length of time from start to finish of a book varies depending on the book. The Gifted Ones Trilogy should have been completed in 2016, but I’m still working on the rough draft. I can usually complete a picture book in about a month including illustrations, given the time to work on it eight hours a day.

How have your family and friends accepted your career as a writer? Are they supportive?

My family is very supportive. I think they’ve finally come to the point where they’ve stopped listening when I say, “That would make a good book!”

Wait! Maybe they’re giving up on me!

Do you tend to base your characters on real people or are they totally from your imagination?

No, I don’t base my characters off real people. They live inside my head awaiting their arrival to the page. Perhaps a little of every person I encounter becomes a part of a character, but on one character is based off one person I’ve met.

What was the inspiration for your latest work of fiction?

Sally the Travelin’ Artist is my latest rhyming picture book. Sally was inspired by book festival decor. Her story began where all saddles make it as festival decoration, at the Giddings, Texas Library and Cultural Center. Sally the Travelin’ Artist is the third book and is set in Central Texas–destination Killeen for Take 190 West. The release date is April 30. I am inspired by everything life offers.

 

Sally The Traveling Artist

Where would you like to travel to and why?

One of the places on my bucket list is Alaska. I’ve traveled to many states in North America, and I’ve been to Canada. I’ve always wanted to visit France, but it’s not a place I have to go now. The only other place I would love to travel to is some of the islands, not Hawaii, but maybe the Bahamas, or Jamaica, or St. Thomas. I love the beach and clear water and wilderness! Those are perfect writing and inspiration places!

Tell us about how you develop your characters?

That’s a good question. Readers have touted me for developing strong characters, but the truth is I don’t develop my characters; they develop me. Each of my characters is a bit of me, and each time I write from my character’s perspective, I become more developed and complete. I picture the process as Noah opening the Arc doors. I open the door, and the characters pour themselves out onto the page.

Which one of your characters is your favorite and why?

That’s tough. I’m partial to Cheater, in The Gifted Ones The Fairytale. On some levels, she’s me at that age, without that spectacular gift. I mean, my gift is spectacular (speaking of ego), but not like hers. I relate to her on so many levels. She’s a good kid who’s suffered in her life, but she never gives up and never gives in.

 

What would you like readers to know?

I’m excited to share that I’ve created a Patreon writing blog where my fans can subscribe and interact with me while I complete those writing projects I’m working on! I’ve included some great subscriber rewards like free books, free image downloads, Google Hangouts with me to talk writing and wine, or Hangouts for the classroom to talk writing with students. I love the idea of interacting with readers. The opening idea for The Gifted Ones The Spiral was inspired by a comment one of my readers made about a comic con costume. Love the opening! So, if you’re a reader and you want early access to my work, hop on over to https://www.patreon.com/pgshriver and get some!

Thanks for hosting me on your blog, Barn Town Eve!

          P. G. Shriver Blog
Character Site
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Guest on Pandora’s Box Gazette

Link for my guest appearance at the new Kid’s Corner today:

https://www.pandorasboxjt.com/single-post/2018/04/28/Kids-Corner-Adventures-in-Barn-Town.

Head on over and visit awhile.

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Posted in Adventures in Barn Town, Ann Jones - Author, authors, blog, children, children stories, Pandora's Box Gazette, Uncategorized, work, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Morning at the barn.

Posted in animals, barns, blog, donkeys, goats, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to become a Children’s Author

via How to Become a Children’s Author

I have been asked by many folks on how to become a published author. That is easy and yet at the same time hard question to answer.

So, if you’re still interested, read the above article. The article does an excellent job of providing clear answers.

Happy reading and of course, writing.

Calvin-Writing

 

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Author Interview with Sara R. Turnquist!

Hello Sara and welcome to my blog.

author pic

It is so very nice to meet you! Tell us a bit about you where are you from and other than writing what else do you enjoy?

I enjoy a great many things – reading, painting, music (singing and piano), crafting, decorating, scrapbooking…but who has the time for all of that???

How did you start writing? What was your inspiration to create?

I have always written in some form or another – short stories mostly. Then one day I was inspired to write a longer story, it grew and became a novel. Then I wrote another…and another… I am inspired by relationships between people, and by historical events and time periods. History fascinates me.

Who is your favorite author, is there anyone out there that inspires you?

Melanie Dickerson and Tamara Leigh are favorites of mine. I love how they draw you back into their respective time periods. I also love Joanne Bischof for her expert deep point of view. You really feel like you are in the story, feeling what the character feels…it’s amazing.

What genre do you enjoy reading? What’s your favorite book and why?

I love clean historical romance. My favorite book has to be “Redeeming Love” by Francine Rivers. It spoke to me on so many levels. The story is just so well written, but on a deeper, more spiritual level, it brought me a better understanding of myself.

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

It gave me a reason to invest in myself, in my education of the craft of writing. I started going to writers conferences and learned a TON! My writing has grown tremendously. I was purely a pantser (write “by the seat of my pants”, without an outline (like a “plotter”)), for example. Now, I would call myself a PLANTSER. I do planning/plotting/development for my characters beforehand and then I pants the rest. I have also learned more about writing that flows, but is tight. Before I was a bit concise, unnecessarily tight.

If you’ve published a series, what is the series about?

I have two series:

The Lady Bornekova Series – about the Hussite Wars in what is today the Czech Republic. It was their religious civil wars. It follows a handful of characters through the events leading up to the wars and during the wars (and, of course, each book is driven by a romance)

A Convenient Risk Series – set in the late 1800s small-town Southeastern Arizona, the first book follows a marriage of convenience with a cameo by Billy the Kid; the companion novella, “An Inconvenient Christmas”, picks up a story thread from the first book and develops it further.

 

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An Inconvenient Christmas.jpg

What was it like creating back to back stories that link?

Interesting…I loved staying with the same characters, telling more of their stories, developing them further, and seeing what happens in the “next chapter” of their lives, so to speak.

Have you ever thought about writing in a different genre? If you could, what genre would you like to dabble in?

I have thought about it. My first love growing up was Science Fiction. But I don’t think I have the drive for it. I have a devotional book almost ready to go. It is with a licensed counselor now for review so she can endorse it.

What has been your most proud moment as an author?

Some of the reviews and feedback. One of the reviewers said something to the effect that my book “renewed her love for historical fiction” and another reader sent me a note and told me that one of my books helped her enjoy romance books again after a difficult divorce…reaching people in a meaningful way is more important to me.

Was there ever a time you wanted to pick up your laptop, and then launch it out the window with frustration?

I dabble in historical research and have to hunt down sometimes difficult to find details…of course I have! And when the historical timeline won’t work out with my fictional timeline, it drives me crazy until I can figure it out…

Are you a “plotter” or a fly by the seat of your pants “pantster” as a writer?

I am in-between – a PLANTSER. I do a LOT of character development/planning in the beginning, before I ever write anything. Once those characters are firmly established in my mind, I pants everything else. 

Am I the only one who gets hung up on commas? Do they make you go blah! when you’re writing?

I have learned a lot more about commas since starting to write seriously, but they still catch me up a lot. Thank God for good editors!

What three tips would you give any aspiring writer?

  • be determined: no one is going to care about your work as much as you are, so if you don’t feel like working and you don’t, no one is going to make you.
  • you are the captain of your ship: even if you have a publisher, even if you have an agent; you need to realize that this is YOUR career, you need to have an idea where you are going, what your goals are, and manage that plan; don’t hand your career over to anyone else; they don’t care as much as you do about you.
  • continue your education: you will never “arrive”; there is always more to learn; some of that will come from classes (online or at conferences), some from other authors through critique groups (online or in person), some through reading others’ work (in ALL genres, not just yours), and some from just doing and learning by creating and editing.

What are you working on now? What will you release next?

I am working on two books:

“Among the Pages” – a time slip set in contemporary period about a freshman in college trying to find who she is; she discovers a diary in her parents’ attic that belonged to her great, great aunt, who was a part of the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the early 1900s; so the story is part in the contemporary period, and part in the historical period.

“Trail of Fears” (working title) – this is about a missionary to a Cherokee village; he arrives shortly before the passage of the Indian Removal Act; so, through his eyes and the perspective of a Cherokee maiden, we experience the happenings in the village and around them between the passage of this Act and the forcible removal of the Cherokee through their trip along the Trail of Tears to their new home west of the Mississippi River – **this will likely be the next release.

So… where can we get your books?

All of my books are on Amazon.

Many are also on Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, and iTunes.

How would you define what being a successful writer means?

Writing what you want, when you want, and how you want; getting your intended message or question out without it being diluted.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers?

I think it CAN hurt, but not necessarily. I think there’s something to be said for having an eager and humble spirit about yourself. 

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I use solid sources. So, not Wikipedia…for example. But, Wikipedia can be a good place to start (not for info), to look at their bibliography and find resources to go to. I’ve found wonderful books to read for research using this method. I usually do enough research to have a basic idea of the subject matter; then I start writing; when I hit a wall or a question, I do more research, as much as I need, before going back to writing. I’ve heard it said about historical writers: “When the history runs dry, throw in some fiction; when the fiction falls flat, throw in more history.” So true.

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

I do. I don’t always advise this. And certainly not for newbies. The only reason I read them is to get a gauge on what my audience thinks are my strengths and weaknesses. If a review is just nasty, it is not helpful in any way and I chuck it mentally. If it is appropriate, but has some critique points, I take what I can from it to try to improve. I’ve had a lot of “high feedback” jobs and I see the value in using feedback to improve myself and my work. Likewise, I read good reviews to see my strengths, what I’m doing well, to continue to work those strengths.

What was your hardest scene to write?

Fight scenes. I am better at it. But I do not really enjoy reading fight scenes or battle scenes, so I include only what is necessary and minimalize details. Emotionally speaking, some of the scenes in “Trail of Fears” have been very hard to write. To know that people endured such treatment and that what I’m writing, though fictionalized, is based on reality, is hard.

What’s your writing schedule like?

I usually write in the evenings or in the middle of the day when my 4-year-old is in “quiet time”. He doesn’t nap anymore, mind you, but my kids have all had “quiet time” in their rooms. They don’t have to sleep or lay down…they can play, but they need to be quiet and in their rooms. I think some alone time is good for them.

What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

My writing mentor, who constantly encourages and inspires me, is best-selling author Hannah R. Conway. She has taught me so much and given me my biggest push into this world of writing. She is amazing!

How do you go from an idea for a book to the birth of the story? Is the process the same for every book you write? How long does it take you to write a book?

Idea to birth of the story is very short for me…my mind/imagination works very quickly. My husband, who is also a writer, helps me brainstorm if I get caught on details and we have the story idea down pretty quickly after the idea/spark has hit me. The process is almost the same for every book. Time to write has varied, but my books usually come together (first draft) in about 3 months. Then it’s edits. A novella can take as little as 3 days for first draft.

How have your family and friends accepted your career as a writer? Are they supportive?

My family is so thrilled. They have been supportive. But they are waiting for audio for all my books as my dad doesn’t read and my sister is SUPER busy. My mom read everything I wrote, but she passed a year ago April. She was probably my biggest fan in the family.

Do you tend to base your characters on real people or are they totally from your imagination?

I took a class once at a conference that suggested that even in our imagination, the characters are made up of pieces of other people (or other characters we’ve seen or read) brought together. And I tend to agree. So, I will say they are based on real people or on other characters I’ve seen or read. Not intentionally, mind you. I believe I am imagining them. The female leads probably all have a piece of me.

What was the inspiration for your latest work of fiction?

The two I’m working on now was actually written about a year ago. I am in the editing phase. The most recent work I wrote was the Christmas companion for “A Convenient Risk”. The inspiration was the characters from “A Convenient Risk” and the Christmas season itself. I wanted to do a Christmas novella and that was it!

Where would you like to travel to and why?

I have been to the Czech Republic multiple times, but I would go back in a heartbeat. I fell in love with the people and the culture. And now that I have done so much research, I would like to visit some of these historical sites. 

Tell us about how you develop your characters?

I use Susan May Warren’s SEQ (Story Equation) Method and her LINDY HOP outline. I don’t want to divulge too much because it’s in her book “The Story Equation” (available on Amazon) and she also has a workbook “How to Write a Brilliant Novel” (also available on Amazon) – I highly recommend both.

Which one of your characters is your favorite and why?

I really like Karin…she has risen above so many obstacles and she has that stubbornness in her that keeps her true to her goals.

What would you like readers to know?

I love what I do. I just enjoy writing stories. And I appreciate every single person who picks up one of my books and reads it. And tries to see the meaning in it. Or just enjoys the story. I write for both reasons.

Contact and Buy Info:

Sara R. Turnquist – http://saraturnquist.com

Author, Domestic Engineer, & Super Mom

Website: http://saraturnquist.com/

Twitter: @sarat1701 https://twitter.com/sarat1701

Facebook Author Page: AuthorSaraRTurnquist https://www.facebook.com/authorsararturnquist/

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/saravturnquist/

BUY LINKS – “A Convenient Risk”

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Convenient-Risk-Book-ebook/dp/B071F96624/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1521593965&sr=8-1&keywords=a+convenient+risk

Barnes & Noble:

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-convenient-risk-sara-r-turnquist/1126478519?ean=9781546753889

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/a-convenient-risk

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/729036

BUY LINKS – “An Inconvenient Christmas”

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Inconvenient-Christmas-companion-novella-Convenient-ebook/dp/B077Q95CF7/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1521594270&sr=1-1&keywords=an+inconvenient+christmas

Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/an-inconvenient-christmas-sara-r-turnquist/1127539743?ean=9781979927925

Posted in authors, blog, books, Christmas, creative writing, Hannah R. Conway, history, research, Romance, Sara R. Turnquist, Susan May Warren’s SEQ, Uncategorized, work, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment